Home School Dads

Line


Spacespace
Message Boards
Stripes

space
Home School Dads
A Website for Fathers who Home School
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Public School!! -- NO WAY!
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Home School Dads Forum Index -> Reasons for Starting
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
BigDaddy
Site Admin


Joined: 25 Feb 2005
Posts: 148
Location: Orlando

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2005 8:51 am    Post subject: Public School!! -- NO WAY! Reply with quote

With all the problems in todays public schools, I just refuse to send my kids there. I'm sure they would be suggesting my youngest to have A.D.D. and be medicated. We had them in a private Christian school for 2 years at first. Then they were going through some major staff changes. The same year we pulled our kids out, they lost HALF their students that year.

I finally convinced my wife to let me homeschool them. It has been a challenge, but it has also been rewarding. And the rewards have been greater than the challenges.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
chan58



Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 18
Location: Baltimore, MD

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2005 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great topic! We became appalled with a public school system where bad politics drive poor policy, and we were disenfranchised with the results of sending our kids through the private school network - $126k later, our older kids can't multiply 3x22 in their heads. It all culminated in a grand total of 1 year of college between the two of them. And we were very involved parents as school was concerned... as involved as two parents who work full-time ++ can be.

The public school system in Prince George's County Maryland, where we live, is shameful. Kids are bused all over the county, with seemingly no real stragegy behind it. School districts are reorganized on a whim. Performance is abysmal. Discipline and security are the focus.

Now we're raising round two. We never set out to homeschool them. My unemployment came at an opportune moment, and we sort of fell into it. We now realize what a blessing it is. The added benefit of having a parent home with them full-time has produced tangible improvements in their dispositions and confidence, not to mention our own peace of mind.

As it turns out, we suspect one of the boys is mildly autistic, and we can't imagine what he'd be experiencing in the public school system.

We never thought we'd be able to survive on a single income. Amazing how easy it was when we were forced into it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
NW_Dad@home
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2005 6:52 pm    Post subject: Awful Public Schools Reply with quote

We never set out to homeschool, either. My wife and I both attended public schools and we were excited for our son when it was time for him to enter kindergarten.
Kindergarten was OK, but 1st grade was awful. The school adopted a "New Math" program and after a few months it became clear to me that the school was not interested in teaching basic math skills to the kids. Instead, they were playing with patterns and calling it math.
After numerous meetings with his teacher, principal, and school district representatives, it became clear to me that math isn't the only subject they had difficulty teaching or explaining to parents (much less the children!)
So, when my daughter reached kindergarten age, we decided that it wasn't worth the headaches to have two children in a school system that wasn't doing it's job.
Back to top
BigDaddy
Site Admin


Joined: 25 Feb 2005
Posts: 148
Location: Orlando

PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2005 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NW_dad,
So are you homeschooling them both now? How did your children like it and what differences have you seen in them?

Mark
_________________
Father of 2 formerly homeschooled boys: Adam-15, Lucas-13
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ProWriter



Joined: 20 May 2005
Posts: 3
Location: Norwood, PA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2005 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I started homeschooling my 5th grade son 3/4 of the way through the year. His teacher was abysmal--a 4th-grade teacher transferred from another school in the district when that school went from three 4th grade classes to two; my radar went up when I saw she was in her 50s. Now, why would a person that age opt to leave a school she taught at nearly 20 years? Would she not have seniority? I was assured by the principal that she came voluntarily to fill the spot at my son's school, and she wasn't a problem teacher, yet calls to the school she came from were met with silence, then stock answers. Hey, my wife was a teacher. My friends are teachers. That teacher was forced out. And my son and his class suffered. I didn't believe the stories the kids were saying--verbal abuse, name calling, high-pitched shouting--all by the teacher directed at the students. My wife talked about taking him out a few years before and teaching him at home, but due to her brain cancer she wasn't able to be, well, "there" all the time, and I had to be employed in a "real" job for the insurance benefits.
Now it's just me and my son. He finished the 5th grade at home, we did 6th grade, and now he's 7th grade--although those are "school district" terms. In truth, he's learning more at higher levels than possible in a traditional school. We have the freedom to go on trips, study one subject extensively, or blow off a day and just have some fun. He's the envy of his peers. And while I school him year round, he has more time off than his friends in regular school. Sure, it's tough sometimes juggling working at home and teaching at the same time, but we've worked it out, for the most part.
I also firmly believe that we don't teach kids what they need to know soon enough to function in the real world. They are adults far sooner than most are ready to admit, and a firm grasp of the world will benefit them far more than some electives they have to take in 12th grade to meet graduation requirements, staying in school bored to death. At the rate he's learning, he'll get his homeschool high school diploma before he gets a driver's license (which, by the way, he's learning to do now, in secured areas; the more practice the better).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Rich



Joined: 18 May 2005
Posts: 173
Location: Coastal New England

PostPosted: Tue Jun 14, 2005 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ProWriter wrote:
I started homeschooling my 5th grade son 3/4 of the way through the year. His teacher was abysmal--a 4th-grade teacher transferred from another school in the district when that school went from three 4th grade classes to two; my radar went up when I saw she was in her 50s. Now, why would a person that age opt to leave a school she taught at nearly 20 years? Would she not have seniority? I was assured by the principal that she came voluntarily to fill the spot at my son's school, and she wasn't a problem teacher, yet calls to the school she came from were met with silence, then stock answers. Hey, my wife was a teacher. My friends are teachers. That teacher was forced out. And my son and his class suffered. I didn't believe the stories the kids were saying--verbal abuse, name calling, high-pitched shouting--all by the teacher directed at the students. My wife talked about taking him out a few years before and teaching him at home, but due to her brain cancer she wasn't able to be, well, "there" all the time, and I had to be employed in a "real" job for the insurance benefits.
Now it's just me and my son. He finished the 5th grade at home, we did 6th grade, and now he's 7th grade--although those are "school district" terms. In truth, he's learning more at higher levels than possible in a traditional school. We have the freedom to go on trips, study one subject extensively, or blow off a day and just have some fun. He's the envy of his peers. And while I school him year round, he has more time off than his friends in regular school. Sure, it's tough sometimes juggling working at home and teaching at the same time, but we've worked it out, for the most part.
I also firmly believe that we don't teach kids what they need to know soon enough to function in the real world. They are adults far sooner than most are ready to admit, and a firm grasp of the world will benefit them far more than some electives they have to take in 12th grade to meet graduation requirements, staying in school bored to death. At the rate he's learning, he'll get his homeschool high school diploma before he gets a driver's license (which, by the way, he's learning to do now, in secured areas; the more practice the better).


My heart goes out to you for the loss of your wife. Knowing what's entailed, I find your ability to carry out your commitment to homeschooling while grieving, admirable. Many of the experiences you described about your son's last year in public school were similar to ones we had for my son's first year. I understand how radar is sometimes your only clue and really shouldn't be ignored. Your reflections really give excellent testimony to how you move with the rhytrhm of learning which really has nothing to do with a classroom. I wish you and your son well.
_________________
homeschooling since '97: daughter, 18- away at college, son, 16 and daughter 13
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
guest
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unfortunately for those public school bashers, the evidence shows that public school chidlren fare as well as private school kids, and the public school kids actually exceed the performance of those enrolled in fundy and conservative evangelical schools. I am not agreat fan of public schools either for various reasons, however, they produce good students every bit as well as private schools do.
Back to top
Rich



Joined: 18 May 2005
Posts: 173
Location: Coastal New England

PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

guest wrote:
Unfortunately for those public school bashers, the evidence shows that public school chidlren fare as well as private school kids, and the public school kids actually exceed the performance of those enrolled in fundy and conservative evangelical schools. I am not agreat fan of public schools either for various reasons, however, they produce good students every bit as well as private schools do.


Hello guest,

I find myself in agreement with your position on public vs. private school in terms of "fairing just as well" and producing students of equal achievement. I don't see where your statement regarding "fundy and conservative evangelical" schools fits in. Where is the data comparing those with other private and/or public schools? Finally, you post your statement on a website which is mostly frequented by homeschoolers. Have you seen the data on how homeschooled students compare with those from public and private schools? The HSLDA sponsored an independent study around two years ago showing that test scores of homeschooled students were an average of ten percent higher than those of conventionally educated students. Any thoughts on that? Thanks for posting.

Rich
_________________
homeschooling since '97: daughter, 18- away at college, son, 16 and daughter 13
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
guest
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rich,

My son is home schooled. As to the comment about devout religious schools. The data is there for your review in the study.

I will try to find the title although I believe it was put out by the US dept of education. Naturally, the Bush people attempted to suppess it, and released it on a Friday leading to a holiday weekend....mighta been around the 4th of July.
Back to top
Rich



Joined: 18 May 2005
Posts: 173
Location: Coastal New England

PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

guest wrote:
Rich,

My son is home schooled. As to the comment about devout religious schools. The data is there for your review in the study.

I will try to find the title although I believe it was put out by the US dept of education. Naturally, the Bush people attempted to suppess it, and released it on a Friday leading to a holiday weekend....mighta been around the 4th of July.


Hi again,

If you homeschool then, what was your reason for posting this comment? You got a rise out of me, anyway. Obviously you've come to the conclusion that conventional education, public or private, isn't working. We know the Department of Education will try to discredit anything that isn't public school. Too bad they spend more resources trying to make the system look good than trying to just make it good. Good luck

Rich
_________________
homeschooling since '97: daughter, 18- away at college, son, 16 and daughter 13
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Guest






PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a product of the public school system, and a public university that ranks with the best Ivy league schools in most departments, I will always defend the schools. My wife and I had. more of an issue with social influences upon our child.

We also know that those who support private and charter schools will discredit public schools at every turn, and have done so for decades. The study refutes their claims.[/quote]
Back to top
RB



Joined: 06 Apr 2006
Posts: 55

PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:23 pm    Post subject: Missing the Mark Reply with quote

As with most debates concerning education, I believe that this one misses the mark. The problems with education, whether in public, private, or home schools, rest with the parents.

Having taught in all three, I have seen my share of academic performers and classic under achievers. My first parent-teacher experience was an eye-opener. I was teaching in a public school as a long-term substitute health teacher. Some of my students did very well, many did not. I had 153 students in my classes that year. Three parents attended conferences.

In my second year, at a private Catholic school, I had my hands full. There was 100% parental participation. It was difficult to schedule them all and stay on schedule, and that was a good problem to have. The majority of my students were high achievers. And I still faced battles with parents who could not believe that their child plagiarized in a paper, proof-be-damned! I had parents attack my credentials because I required my students to use an MLA format for writing research papers. Some refused to believe that their star child could lose academic eligibility in sports, even after the child admitted that they failed to hand-in a major project. Oy!

I cannot tell you how many parents of high school students answered the phone, listened to my request for help with their child, and responded with, “What do you want me to do about it?”

Don’t we all know of at least one family who claims to be home schooling but does not really academically challenge their children?


The problems with education will not be solved by federal, state, or local laws. The problems are not related to the current administration withholding information, or the Department of Education suppressing news. No amount of money will fix the problem. The problems won’t be fixed by government because good parenting that stresses the value of education cannot be legislated.


Last edited by RB on Sat Sep 15, 2007 10:16 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
guest
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RB,

Your arguments are compelling, and you are right, the argument about school types does miss the mark. My point was that too many in this site tend to trash public schools, and now the evidence suggest that they perform quite well against private schools.
Back to top
Rich



Joined: 18 May 2005
Posts: 173
Location: Coastal New England

PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You all make excellent points but still, the conventional school system doesn't pass muster. You all have agreed directly as well as indirectly because you all educate your kids at home. I don't blindly fault the educators in fact, I'm sympathetic. I hold parents responsible too, for failing to meet their obligations but cannot blame them for the failing educational system either. I do find the concept of charter schools intriguing and have read of several successes with them. The reasons published for this success were dedicated parents, dedicated students and dedicated teachers. I think that all three components are necessary for any successful school, don't you?

Rich
_________________
homeschooling since '97: daughter, 18- away at college, son, 16 and daughter 13
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
RB



Joined: 06 Apr 2006
Posts: 55

PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"You all have agreed directly as well as indirectly because you all educate your kids at home. "

You are making an invalid assumption that the reason we are home schooling is because we believe that the public school system is inadequate. That may or may not be a component in the decision to home school, as there are multiple factors involved in the choice. The Lansing, Kansas, school system is a good system. That we choose not to use it is not a condemnation of public schools in general, or of our local district in particular.

"The reasons published for this success were dedicated parents, dedicated students and dedicated teachers. I think that all three components are necessary for any successful school, don't you?"

I would argue that there is a far better chance that good parenting can make-up for the shortfalls of a poor teacher than a good teacher can make-up for the shortfalls of poor parenting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Home School Dads Forum Index -> Reasons for Starting All times are GMT - 4 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Space

Space
Space
space